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Publications & Research Products

Products found: 170
  • Regulating Price Discounting in Providence, RI

    This case study is the first in a series to highlight innovative work in the point of sale policy area. The case studies are intended to provide tobacco control advocates with practical, real world examples that may be used to inform future policy efforts.

  • Relative tax rates, proximity and cigarette tax avoidance: Evidence from a national sample of littered cigarette packs

    We use data from a national sample of littered packs to understand the determinants of tax avoidance. Our results demonstrate that tax avoidance is strongly correlated with economic incentives but avoidance will rarely if ever result in revenue declines following tax rate increases.

  • Results from a Brief Intervention to Promote Smoke-Free Homes among 2-1-1 Clients.

    Poster: Bundy L, Kegler M, Haardorfer R, Escoffery C, Berg C, Yembra D,... Burnham D. Results from a brief intervention to promote smoke-free homes among 2-1-1 clients. Presented at the 142nd Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, November 15-19, 2014, New Orleans, LA.

  • Risk factors associated with Hookah use.

    Background: Potential harms associated with hookah smoking are largely unrecognized and it is emerging as a trendy behavior. To help inform policy and preventive interventions, we used responses from a population survey of US adults to examine risk factors associated with hookah involvement. Method: An online survey of 17 522 US adults was conducted in 2013. The nationally representative sample was drawn from GfK Group’s KnowledgePanel plus off-panel recruitment. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between tobacco use patterns across multiple products (cigarettes, cigars, and dissolvables), perceived harms towards regular pipe/hookah use, and demographic characteristics with hookah involvement (never used, ever used with/without reusing intent). Result: Nearly one in five (16%) of the respondents had smoked hookah at least once in their life (“ever users”). Ever users of hookah were at higher risk of having used cigarettes, cigars, and dissolvable tobacco products (all P < .01). Odds for hookah use were greater for those who perceived regular pipe/hookah use as less dangerous (P < .05). Odds for hookah involvement were higher among young adults (P < .001), individuals with higher educational attainment (P < .01), and Hispanics/Latinos (P < .05). Conclusions: Information about the public health harms associated with hookah smoking should be delivered to individuals at-risk for hookah smoking. It is likely that misconceptions about the safety of hookah smoking could be driving, at least in-part, its increase in popularity.

  • Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Young Adult Sexual Minority Bar and Nightclub Patrons

    Objectives. We compared exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) and attitudes toward smoke-free bar and nightclub policies among patrons of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) and non-LGBT bars and nightclubs. Methods. We conducted randomized time location sampling surveys of young adults (aged 21?30 years) in 7 LGBT (n=1113 patrons) and 12 non-LGBT (n=1068 patrons) venues in Las Vegas, Nevada, in 2011, as part of a cross-sectional study of a social branding intervention to promote a tobacco-free lifestyle and environment in bars and nightclubs. Results. Compared with non-LGBT bars and nightclubs, patrons of LGBT venues had 38% higher adjusted odds of having been exposed to SHS in a bar or nightclub in the past 7 days but were no less likely to support smoke-free policies and intended to go out at least as frequently if a smoke-free bar and nightclub law was passed. Conclusions. The policy environment in LGBT bars and nightclubs appears favorable for the enactment of smoke-free policies, which would protect patrons from SHS and promote a smoke-free social norm.

  • Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Smoking Behavior Among Young Adult Bar Patrons

    Objectives. We described frequency of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among young adults patronizing bars and associations between SHS exposure, attitudes, and smoking behavior. Methods. We collected cross-sectional surveys from randomized time location samples of bar patrons aged 18 to 26 years in San Diego, California, and Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 2010 to 2011. Multivariate logistic regression evaluated associations between SHS exposure, attitudes about dangers of SHS, susceptibility to smoking initiation among nonsmokers, and quit attempts among current smokers. Results. More than 80% of respondents reported past 7-day exposure to any SHS, and more than 70% reported exposure at a bar. Current smokers reported more SHS exposure in cars and their own homes than did nonsmokers. Among nonsmokers, SHS exposure was associated with susceptibility to initiation, but those who believed that SHS exposure is harmful were less susceptible. Belief that SHS is dangerous was associated with quit attempts among smokers. Conclusions. Smoke-free environments and education about the harms of SHS may decrease tobacco use among young adults who frequent bars, where they are heavily exposed to SHS.

  • Smoke-Free Home Booklet for U.S. Asian Populations

    A picture story booklet depicting a young couple’s efforts to set up a home ban to protect their unborn child from secondhand smoke. These booklets were inspired by similar materials our Emory collaborators developed for their large home ban intervention study. Our Chinese colleagues spearheaded the content for both booklets by generating culturally relevant examples to enhance the relevance and relatability of these materials. For example, they explained the importance of not embarrassing smokers who want to smoke in someone’s home and of being respectful toward elders. They also recommended using cartoon images rather than photographs of people for the picture story. We consider this booklet as a potential product for U.S. Asian populations; it is currently in Simplified Chinese. Please contact Jessica Sun (j4sun@ucsd.edu) for more information.

  • Smoke-Free Home Booklets for U.S. Asian Populations: Challenges and Solutions

    A booklet addressing challenges and solutions. These booklets were inspired by similar materials our Emory collaborators developed for their large home ban intervention study. Our Chinese colleagues spearheaded the content for both booklets by generating culturally relevant examples to enhance the relevance and relatability of these materials. For example, they explained the importance of not embarrassing smokers who want to smoke in someone’s home and of being respectful toward elders. They also recommended using cartoon images rather than photographs of people for the picture story. We consider this booklet as a potential product for U.S. Asian populations; it is currently in Simplified Chinese. Please contact Jessica Sun (j4sun@ucsd.edu) for more information.

  • Smoke-Free Homes and Home Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Shanghai, China

    Few studies have examined home exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) in China. This study aimed to document: (1) the prevalence and correlates of exposure to SHS in homes (in adult non-smokers) in Shanghai, and (2) enforcement of rules, harm reduction behaviors, and self-efficacy for maintaining smoke-free homes in Shanghai. A total of 500 participants were recruited using a multistage proportional random sampling design in an urban and suburban district to complete a survey. Among the total 355 nonsmokers, 127 (35.8%) participants reported being exposed to SHS in the past 7 days. Participants living with smokers in the home, with no smoking restriction at home, and having children younger than 18 were more likely to be exposed to SHS at home. Higher self-efficacy in maintaining a smoke-free home was negatively associated with home SHS exposure. Having visitors who smoke was the greatest policy enforcement challenge. Ineffective measures such as opening windows were more commonly used in homes with partial bans. Educational initiatives to protect against SHS exposure in the home should promote smoke-free homes, address challenges to implementing such policies, and address misconceptions regarding the effectiveness of supposed harm reduction behaviors.

  • Smoke-Free Homes Website

    The Smoke-Free Homes Website (http://smokefreehomes.emory.edu) was developed to provide families information on smoke-free home rules, harms of secondhand smoke exposure, and the steps to creating a smoke-free home rule. It's also a great resource for foster care parents and case managers interested in information on smoke-free rules in the foster care environment. Foster care families can utilize this site and take a quiz to receive continuing education credits recognized by the Georgia Department of Human Services. This site also offers videos on challenges to creating smoke-free home rules and an easy way to order a free kit containing our general or foster care smoke-free home materials.